Dallas Fort Worth Urban Forum

DFW Economy

DPatel304
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby DPatel304 » 04 Oct 2019 13:48

I think, in the long run, they'll probably be fine. Eventually Dallas will start to fill up and become more and more expensive, and, at that point, Fort Worth becomes more and more attractive. I do think that will take sometime though, as Dallas seems to be just now hitting its stride.

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Tivo_Kenevil
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Tivo_Kenevil » 04 Oct 2019 14:00

Hannibal Lecter wrote:Q: What's the one thing Fort Worth has that Dallas doesn't?

A: A major city 30 miles away.


You Savage, you!

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Tivo_Kenevil
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Tivo_Kenevil » 04 Oct 2019 14:04

IMO, Ft. Worth just misses the mark for a lot people. They wanna be known as "cow town"; which is cool, but it really doesn't appeal to alot people, including corporations who are looking to offer something that appeals to their workers.

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flyswatter
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby flyswatter » 04 Oct 2019 14:52

I'd love to see how Minneapolis vs. St Paul match up and how that compares to Dallas vs. Ft Worth.

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Tivo_Kenevil
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Tivo_Kenevil » 04 Oct 2019 15:16

flyswatter wrote:I'd love to see how Minneapolis vs. St Paul match up and how that compares to Dallas vs. Ft Worth.

Never been. But I head Minneapolis is quite nice.

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Tivo_Kenevil
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Tivo_Kenevil » 04 Oct 2019 15:18

flyswatter wrote:I'd love to see how Minneapolis vs. St Paul match up and how that compares to Dallas vs. Ft Worth.

Never been. But I hear Minneapolis is quite nice. No one ever talks about St. Paul; so there's that.

cowboyeagle05
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby cowboyeagle05 » 04 Oct 2019 16:36

It's funny I could have easily read the same article as meaning Dallas isn't a great place to live. Why sit in terrible traffic for three hours or even an hour when you could live in a great Dallas neighborhood but people choose the drive. Even some new transplants buy a car and adapt to car-based life not because they hated transit in another city just they adapt to the way our system is designed.

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tamtagon
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby tamtagon » 04 Oct 2019 20:19

Hannibal Lecter wrote:Q: What's the one thing Fort Worth has that Dallas doesn't?

A: A major city 30 miles away.



“We’re still somewhat overshadowed by the Dallas region,” said Robert Sturns, Fort Worth economic development director.

hahaha

cowboyeagle05
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby cowboyeagle05 » 05 Oct 2019 10:27

Also because DFW isnt centrally economically driven housing prices don't necessarily cost less just by not being in Downtown for example. In some cases, I can pay less living in Oak Lawn than living in Legacy, Plano or even parts of cities like Garland.

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tamtagon
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby tamtagon » 05 Oct 2019 11:49

There's barely interest enough for one old school "downtown" in any Sunbelt population center; the corporate campus cornerstone of supreme suburban development starting in the 80s turned into Mixed Use New Urbanism --- an ironic term many people want to use when measuring success or failure of a traditional central business district.

The measuring stick of "city living" currently possible in cities built before air conditioned suburbs (New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Boston, Detroit{hands up for Detroit}) still applies those remnants of Sunbelt cities like Dallas and Fort Worth. Municipal decision makers are just as confused today as they were in the 60/70s, 80/90s, and 00/10s and continue the debilitating, compulsive envy of how fast the edge of town changes. Dallas has made remarkable improvement to reinvent city living, but the incentives are still geared toward businesses. Even the parks the city has built touts how companies like that sort of thing.

Focus on the people living in the neighborhood and everything else will fall into place. It's always been this way, and likely always will be that way. There's nothing wrong with an entire sections of a street grid that are dormant at night and busy during the day with suburban office workers. The adjacent residential neighborhoods need a buffer, and a quieter stretch of street in between. Anyway....

Fort Worth is ideally positioned to become a two night - three day destination for the vast population of the Greater Dallas Trading Area and South Central US. Proud and impressive, Fort Worth seems reluctant to accept this role since it's not directly competing against Dallas, but it's a need that will only increase among residents of the South Central US. Half of the overnight tourism stays in greater downtown Fort Worth should come from next door Dallas and Collin Counties.

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Cord1936
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Cord1936 » 05 Oct 2019 14:59

tamtagon wrote:Proud and impressive, Fort Worth seems reluctant to accept this role since it's not directly competing against Dallas, ...

^^^^^^^
bed·room com·mu·ni·ty
noun NORTH AMERICAN
"a residential suburb inhabited largely by people who commute to a nearby city for work"

There's been a series of articles over the last several years discussing the fact that Ft. Worth and Tarrant County "are in danger of becoming a bedroom community to Dallas:"

https://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/fort-worth/article189415729.html
https://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/Study-Fort-Worth--465393913.html
https://www.dmagazine.com/frontburner/2018/01/is-fort-worth-as-doomed-as-this-500-page-report-makes-it-seem/
https://www.dmagazine.com/publications/d-ceo/2018/september/fort-worth-is-trying-to-escape-dallas-shadow/
https://www.star-telegram.com/news/business/growth/article235435372.html

The latest Census Bureau statistics, and the latest Ft. Worth Star Telegram article, confirm in fact that seems to have become reality. To wit:

"But a large number of Fort Worth residents — nearly 192,000 people — still leaves the city for work, Census data shows. Between 2005-14, the percentage of commuters leaving Fort Worth jumped from 53% to 62%."

62%! That is a HUGE NUMBER commuting out of Ft. Worth daily, primarily to Dallas and Dallas County, for work.

Quite frankly, if the Federal Government had not forced Dallas to build its replacement airport for Love Field midway between Dallas and Tarrant Counties, Ft. Worth simply would not have had the growth that it has enjoyed since DFW Airport was built.

The region as a whole has benefited from DFW, that is for certain. But Dallas was originally going to build its new replacement airport for Love Field within its own city limits ... but the Federal subsidies and support needed to build a huge new international airport for Dallas forced the location westward. Speaker of the House at the time, Jim Wright of Ft. Worth, had a heavy influence on this.

DFW Airport has been the driving factor in Northeast Tarrant County's growth, particularly Alliance, that Ft. Worth annexed to be inside its city limits ... just as they reached out to annex a little finger of land to grab AA's original headquarters off Hwy 360 so it, too, would be in their city limits.

Practically any and all significant growth seen in Tarrant County has largely occurred on the far eastern side of the county ... closest to Dallas and DFW Airport.

If someone wanted to be harsh they could say Tarrant has largely been receiving the economic crumbs leftover from Dallas ... and the crumbs have been large enough to cause a nice level of growth in residential development in general and with significant job growth around Alliance specifically.

By and far in the larger picture, Dallas was, is and will continue to be the towering economic and financial giant to the East that has a synergy and momentum that will power Dallas and Dallas Metro's booming growth for decades to come.

Especially if Dallas city leaders wake up and realize the need to bring zoning for the greater central Dallas core (along with Dallas' various satellite downtowns) into the 21st century and start allowing denser and taller developments to encourage and increase density.

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The_Overdog
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby The_Overdog » 07 Oct 2019 09:29

62%! That is a HUGE NUMBER commuting out of Ft. Worth daily, primarily to Dallas and Dallas County, for work.


That is a huge number, considering in your average true suburb there are still local workers like shopkeepers/cleaners/restaurants/teachers/government workers etc, so that a commute percent that even gets to 50% is high.

Tnexster
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Tnexster » 07 Oct 2019 10:58

While Forth Worth was obsessing over Dallas, Plano happened.

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dukemeredith
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby dukemeredith » 07 Oct 2019 13:29

Grant Senter has a terrific job with a startup health care firm in Dallas, and yet he chooses to live in Fort Worth.

Each day, he spends three hours commuting, making the 43-mile trip to and from his home near Eagle Mountain Lake.

“We lived in Dallas for a year, and hated it. I like to say Dallas is like LA without the beach,” said Senter, 27, who has lived in Fort Worth for four years.


I can't trust the opinion of someone who thinks it's reasonable to commute 3 hours each day.

I'd understand if the crazy commute was because cost of living in Dallas was astronomical, like NYC or San Francisco. But it isn't. There are plenty of inexpensive neighborhoods and suburbs within a 1 hour one-way commute of Dallas, including traffic (which is still borderline unreasonable, for me, personally).

That guy is losing 15 hours of his life every week going to and from work.
Insane.

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Tucy
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Tucy » 07 Oct 2019 14:10

Cord1936 wrote:The latest Census Bureau statistics, and the latest Ft. Worth Star Telegram article, confirm in fact that seems to have become reality. To wit:

"But a large number of Fort Worth residents — nearly 192,000 people — still leaves the city for work, Census data shows. Between 2005-14, the percentage of commuters leaving Fort Worth jumped from 53% to 62%."

62%! That is a HUGE NUMBER commuting out of Ft. Worth daily, primarily to Dallas and Dallas County, for work.


That is a huge number, but I don't think there's any reason for your conclusion that those commuters are primarily going to Dallas and Dallas County. Since this is a Fort Worth number, not a Tarrant County number, I suspect they are primarily going elsewhere in Tarrant County. It's instructive that the same article tells us that "nearly 16%" of Tarrant County workers commute to Dallas, so it is unlikely that a significantly higher percentage of Fort Worth workers commute to Dallas.

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The_Overdog
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby The_Overdog » 07 Oct 2019 15:59

I can't trust the opinion of someone who thinks it's reasonable to commute 3 hours each day.

In his defense, he's a 'lake guy' (lives on Eagle Mountain Lake) and I believe Eagle Mountain is the closest (or one of the closest) lakes to DFW where you can own waterfront and build a boatdock.

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Tivo_Kenevil
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Tivo_Kenevil » 07 Oct 2019 17:55

The_Overdog wrote:
I can't trust the opinion of someone who thinks it's reasonable to commute 3 hours each day.

In his defense, he's a 'lake guy' (lives on Eagle Mountain Lake) and I believe Eagle Mountain is the closest (or one of the closest) lakes to DFW where you can own waterfront and build a boatdock.


That's still crazy

DPatel304
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby DPatel304 » 07 Oct 2019 20:22

Seems a bit weird to include that quote in an article talking about people commuting from Fort Worth to Dallas, as his reason for living so far out seems to have little to do with Fort Worth and has more to do with the lake instead.

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tanzoak
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby tanzoak » 12 Oct 2019 02:48

Tucy wrote:
Cord1936 wrote:The latest Census Bureau statistics, and the latest Ft. Worth Star Telegram article, confirm in fact that seems to have become reality. To wit:

"But a large number of Fort Worth residents — nearly 192,000 people — still leaves the city for work, Census data shows. Between 2005-14, the percentage of commuters leaving Fort Worth jumped from 53% to 62%."

62%! That is a HUGE NUMBER commuting out of Ft. Worth daily, primarily to Dallas and Dallas County, for work.


That is a huge number, but I don't think there's any reason for your conclusion that those commuters are primarily going to Dallas and Dallas County. Since this is a Fort Worth number, not a Tarrant County number, I suspect they are primarily going elsewhere in Tarrant County. It's instructive that the same article tells us that "nearly 16%" of Tarrant County workers commute to Dallas, so it is unlikely that a significantly higher percentage of Fort Worth workers commute to Dallas.


Such a huge number that I had to check for myself. It doesn't appear to be accurate. According to the Census American Community Survey, which is the data they use for the map in the article and where they (correctly) get the 16% Tarrant to Dallas figure, 61% of Ft Worth residents work in Ft Worth. 5% work in Arlington, 4% in Dallas, and 3% in Irving. I'm pretty sure someone pulled the city data incorrectly.

https://ctpp.transportation.org/2012-2016-5-year-ctpp/

I45Tex
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby I45Tex » 12 Oct 2019 22:12

The ACS may not be the best tool to use to skin this cat:

https://onthemap.ces.census.gov

Someone can select Fort Worth and then map what counties the city's workers are employed in, and see the top 100 counties in 2017. Then they can change the search and map what other Places (Cities and Census Designated Places, etc.) its workers are employed in, subtracting other Tarrant County places from the total Tarrant had in the first search.

Someone really excited could reverse the search for the same year and see where everybody lives outside of Fort Worth who commutes into Fort Worth, if they desired to know how a gain would net out against its commute losses (how much of a bedroom community it is).

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tanzoak
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby tanzoak » 13 Oct 2019 15:03

I45Tex wrote:The ACS may not be the best tool to use to skin this cat:

https://onthemap.ces.census.gov

Someone can select Fort Worth and then map what counties the city's workers are employed in, and see the top 100 counties in 2017. Then they can change the search and map what other Places (Cities and Census Designated Places, etc.) its workers are employed in, subtracting other Tarrant County places from the total Tarrant had in the first search.

Someone really excited could reverse the search for the same year and see where everybody lives outside of Fort Worth who commutes into Fort Worth, if they desired to know how a gain would net out against its commute losses (how much of a bedroom community it is).


I don't like using LEHD for O-Ds. The biggest issue is that LEHD data is from employers, and particularly for firms with multiple locations, the mailing address that the business provides for its location isn't necessarily the same as the workplace addresses for most of their employees.

The sample size for the ACS is very large for big cities/counties like Ft Worth/Tarrant, so the margin of error is relatively small. LEHD actually has another issue on this front in that it isn't even a probability sample--it's a count from firms paying unemployment insurance--so some types of workers are systematically excluded from the data, biasing it when trying to use it to describe overall flows.

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Re: DFW Economy

Postby I45Tex » 14 Oct 2019 16:16

Thank you for that good discussion. Do you know whether the OMB delineations of core-based statistical areas (for other readers: this includes both micropolitan and metropolitan statistical areas) are being based on ACS, LEHD, or some other dataset updating?

I ask because, in 2017 LEHD, one of the halves for Stephenville μSA's employment interchange measurement equation with DFW MSA is now 25.9%. (If this were the correct data to use, then it would either have been defined as an outlying county inside DFW MSA this year, or else missed it simply due to no longer touching DFW MSA -- cut off now that Hood County is removed from the FW metro division of the MSA into a separate micropolitan area -- is that right?)
Even with the contiguous territory rule, Stephenville would still join DFW CSA, though.

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Re: DFW Economy

Postby I45Tex » 18 Oct 2019 10:25

tanzoak wrote: I don't like using LEHD for O-Ds. The biggest issue is that LEHD data is from employers, and particularly for firms with multiple locations, the mailing address that the business provides for its location isn't necessarily the same as the workplace addresses for most of their employees.

The sample size for the ACS is very large for big cities/counties like Ft Worth/Tarrant, so the margin of error is relatively small. LEHD actually has another issue on this front in that it isn't even a probability sample--it's a count from firms paying unemployment insurance--so some types of workers are systematically excluded from the data, biasing it when trying to use it to describe overall flows.


It looks to me like OMB delineated CBSAs change annually according to cross-boundary employment interchange thresholds that are based on ACS updates, but that those interchange estimates are not included among the ACS updates the public annually gets to look at, so we can't check up on the close calls like Stephenville.

https://www.census.gov/topics/employmen ... flows.html

Do you know of a way to see how close a county is to the threshold of metro inclusion?

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Re: DFW Economy

Postby DPatel304 » 30 Oct 2019 14:00

Image
DFW metro surpasses Seattle and New York metros in the race for more apartment deliveries
This year, Dallas-Fort Worth metro leads with a total of 22,196 new units expected to be built, which will prove beneficial considering the 131,800 new residents that the metro added between 2017 and 2018 (based on U.S. Census estimates).

https://www.rentcafe.com/blog/rental-ma ... tion-2019/

DFW with a huge lead in apartment construction for 2019. I know this is anecdotal, but it seems like people on the coastal cities have been hesitant to move to Texas because of our reputation for being a 'deep red' state. In my experience, that perception (while still there) is definitely changing which might attract more and more people from some of these larger cities.

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Cbdallas
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Cbdallas » 30 Oct 2019 15:48

Could be some perception change but what I keep hearing from people from both coast and Chicago is all taxes taxes taxes. I think that word is getting out more than anything else. They can come here and have more square feet maybe a pool and nice cars on what they save in housing cost and taxes.

DPatel304
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby DPatel304 » 30 Oct 2019 16:43

Oh yeah, it's certainly a combination of things including cost of living. I just know, in the past, the hesitancy has been the perception that Texas seems to have, but, as more people move here, that perception is slowly disappearing.

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Hannibal Lecter
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Hannibal Lecter » 30 Oct 2019 17:26

Demand side is only half the equation. Look at the supply side. Developers are getting gun shy in the NY and CA markets because of the expansion of rent control. No one wants to get stuck owning a building where rents can't keep up with inflation. Historically rent control regulation has exempted newer buildings, but even that seems to be in danger.

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The_Overdog
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby The_Overdog » 31 Oct 2019 10:07

There has been some real shifting in that list if it is accurate.
Portland and Houston have taken the biggest falls - Portland used to be up with Austin. Miami and Seattle are big gainers. DFW and LA are consistent.

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homeworld1031tx
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby homeworld1031tx » 31 Oct 2019 13:42

Great chart and thanks for posting it. Clicking through the link reveals a bit more color to the story though - Dallas proper is only added 3800 of those ~22000 units, and surprisingly Ft Worth has a (barely) larger share of that 22k than Dallas.

Even more, the city propers of Miami and Seattle are in the 7k new apartment range, independent of their metro area siblings.

3800 units is nothing to sneeze at (that equals, what, 10 'Texas Donut' ~5 story apartment builds?), but it is significantly less in the city proper than a few of the other cities on that list.

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tamtagon
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby tamtagon » 01 Nov 2019 06:26

https://dallasinnovates.com/catalyst-si ... he-region/

from Austin55 at the Fort Worth Forum

Tnexster
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Tnexster » 02 Nov 2019 12:38

Nice to see they included RedBird in that article.

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Cord1936
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Cord1936 » 19 Nov 2019 18:34

Image
We Compute: Dallas-Fort Worth’s Data Center Market Shows No Sign of Slowing Down
The wholesale colocation market in the region is as competitive as its ever been, ranking among the nation’s top three data center markets.

By Lance Murray, Dallas Innovates, Nov. 19, 2019

Dallas-Fort Worth has assumed a position near the top of data center industry nationally, and a recent CBRE study indicates that will continue into the future.
...
Dallas is one of the nation’s top three data center markets.
...
Two large colocation deals—Social Media & Technology—were the drivers during the first half of the year, with both being absorbed in the first quarter, CBRE says. A third large deal, Federal IT, was signed in the second quarter, but it won’t be absorbed until later this year.
...
Some of the drivers for the Dallas-Fort Worth market are low power costs, abundant fiber connectivity, a low hazard-risk profile, and attractive tax incentives.

https://dallasinnovates.com/we-compute-dfws-data-center-market-shows-no-sign-of-slowing-down/

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jetnd87
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby jetnd87 » 09 Dec 2019 09:22

Would love the group's thoughts here. Dallas actually listed as one of the major cities that has seen a net loss of high-tech jobs (along with DC, LA, Chicago).

https://www.wsj.com/articles/five-citie ... lista_pos1

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Tucy
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Tucy » 09 Dec 2019 09:36

jetnd87 wrote:Would love the group's thoughts here. Dallas actually listed as one of the major cities that has seen a net loss of high-tech jobs (along with DC, LA, Chicago).

https://www.wsj.com/articles/five-citie ... lista_pos1


Interesting and a little surprising, although after thinking about it, maybe not shocking. Dallas has been experiencing phenomenal job growth, but very little to none of it has been tech. Even the Google jobs are not tech jobs.

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Hannibal Lecter
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Hannibal Lecter » 09 Dec 2019 11:54

Take those kinds of surveys with a very large grain of salt. They tend to only look at larger employers and miss the smaller companies. A lot of the data comes from state agencies, which means there's a lack of standardization. There's not even a clear definition of what a tech job is. Some of these studies use the full body count of anything they consider a tech company -- which includes everyone from the CEO to tha janitors. Is a programmer at Comerica in tech or banking? Is a robotics engineer at Toyota in tech or manufacturing?

And of course there's a huge amount of year-to-year variance. Compare this survey from two years ago: https://www.forbes.com/sites/joelkotkin ... b681138f6b

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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Tnexster » 09 Dec 2019 14:06

As tech sector jumps nationally, Dallas grabs top spot in job openings, report says

https://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/news ... s-top.html

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Cord1936
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Cord1936 » 11 Dec 2019 17:49

Image
Many Of DFW's Corporate Relocations In 2019 Were Poached From San Francisco
Kerri Panchuk, Dallas BisNow, December 10, 2019

Dallas-Fort Worth wooed major Fortune 500 companies and tech giant Uber to the Metroplex this year with promises of a robust workforce and a business-friendly climate.

In some cases, these companies plan to open regional hubs in Dallas, like Uber, while others intend to move their entire corporate headquarters to DFW. In many cases, they already have.

A majority of these firms share one trait: They moved from the Bay Area to DFW.

From late 2018 through the end of this year, Dallas-Fort Worth received notice that San Francisco-based McKesson Corp., Core-Mark and Charles Schwab would either be moving, or had moved, their corporate headquarters to DFW from the Bay Area.

A fourth company — ride-sharing giant Uber — didn't abandon its San Francisco headquarters altogether, but it did make a sizable regional investment in Dallas, announcing plans to lease space inside The Epic II office building in Dallas' Deep Ellum district for a regional office.

So what gives? Why is DFW a magnet for San Francisco companies?

Read more at: https://www.bisnow.com/dallas-ft-worth/ ... um=Browser

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Re: DFW Economy

Postby I45Tex » 11 Dec 2019 18:33

And at 7:30 tomorrow morning we get to run downstairs and unwrap our present from the Bureau of Economic Analysis -- 2018 local GDP statistics!

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The_Overdog
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby The_Overdog » 12 Dec 2019 09:49

DFW got rocked by DC and SF, falling from #4 to #6. All those above us featured nice gains, DFW a small decline. Houston and Austin also suffered GDP declines in Texas.

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Tucy
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Tucy » 12 Dec 2019 10:09

The_Overdog wrote:DFW got rocked by DC and SF, falling from #4 to #6. All those above us featured nice gains, DFW a small decline. Houston and Austin also suffered GDP declines in Texas.


Link? The numbers I'm finding show decent (and similar) growth for DFW and Houston.
Last edited by Tucy on 12 Dec 2019 10:20, edited 1 time in total.

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The_Overdog
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby The_Overdog » 12 Dec 2019 10:15

2017 GDP
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List...n_areas_by_GDP

2018 GDP
http://www.city-data.com/forum/city-vs- ... tro-3.html


BIG EDIT: There is some playing with the numbers - there are some CSAs rather than just all MSAs (which is how SF passed DFW, by combining SF & San Jose). Either way, SF + San Jose still had a giant gain unless there is some MSA I am missing. Same for DC+Baltimore. Solid gains + combination to surpass DFW.

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Re: DFW Economy

Postby DPatel304 » 12 Dec 2019 10:38

Image

Thanks for the link! So this is the GDP by MSA, then?

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Tucy
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Tucy » 12 Dec 2019 10:50

The_Overdog wrote:2017 GDP
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List...n_areas_by_GDP

2018 GDP
http://www.city-data.com/forum/city-vs- ... tro-3.html


BIG EDIT: There is some playing with the numbers - there are some CSAs rather than just all MSAs (which is how SF passed DFW, by combining SF & San Jose). Either way, SF + San Jose still had a giant gain unless there is some MSA I am missing. Same for DC+Baltimore. Solid gains + combination to surpass DFW.


No playing with numbers is apparent. One table compares CSAs. The other (and the table posted by DPatel) compares MSAs (and shows that both Washington and San Francisco passed DFW even without combining with San Jose and Baltimore, respectively.)

BTW, DFW, Houston and Austin all saw solid increases.

Austin: $146,784,519, up 7.5%
DFW: $512,509,778 up 6.3%
Houston: $478,778,576 up 7%
Last edited by Tucy on 12 Dec 2019 13:04, edited 1 time in total.

I45Tex
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby I45Tex » 12 Dec 2019 13:00

Part of what throws readers is that the list of Combined Statistical Areas is not simply the most general national ranking of metro economies, because MSAs like Tampa and Austin are large enough to rank but don't form part of any CSA.

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Tucy
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Tucy » 12 Dec 2019 13:05

I45Tex wrote:Part of what throws readers is that the list of Combined Statistical Areas is not simply the most general national ranking of metro economies, because MSAs like Tampa and Austin are large enough to rank but don't form part of any CSA.


Yeah, I don't really see the utility of a table showing only CSAs. It should also include MSAs that are not part of a CSA.

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The_Overdog
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby The_Overdog » 12 Dec 2019 14:11

BTW, DFW, Houston and Austin all saw solid increases.

Austin: $146,784,519, up 7.5%
DFW: $512,509,778 up 6.3%
Houston: $478,778,576 up 7%


Where are you getting the historical data? Using the one posted by Dpatel for 2018, I see $512, $478, and $146 for DFW, Houston, Austin MSA. The wikipedia chart for 2017 MSAs shows $535, $490, and $148, all higher for 2017 than 2018.

Admin: is there a way to delete the old post so only the correct data (dpatel's chart) shows?

I45Tex
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Joined: 26 Jan 2017 05:52

Re: DFW Economy

Postby I45Tex » 12 Dec 2019 14:17

You may be comparing 2017 nominal dollars to 2018 current nominal dollars. The way to get growth rates is to choose the BEA's chained constant-2012-dollar real GDP table.

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Tucy
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby Tucy » 12 Dec 2019 16:14

The_Overdog wrote:
BTW, DFW, Houston and Austin all saw solid increases.

Austin: $146,784,519, up 7.5%
DFW: $512,509,778 up 6.3%
Houston: $478,778,576 up 7%


Where are you getting the historical data? Using the one posted by Dpatel for 2018, I see $512, $478, and $146 for DFW, Houston, Austin MSA. The wikipedia chart for 2017 MSAs shows $535, $490, and $148, all higher for 2017 than 2018.

Admin: is there a way to delete the old post so only the correct data (dpatel's chart) shows?


From the BEA (same source as dpatel's chart). I don't know where Wikipedia came up with those 2017 numbers; (that is the problem with Wikipedia; often right, but not necessarily reliable.) By the way your Wikipedia link above does not take us to the chart; I'd be interested in seeing what you looked at.

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The_Overdog
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Re: DFW Economy

Postby The_Overdog » 12 Dec 2019 16:45

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._metropolitan_areas_by_GDP

or the search is 'List of US metropolitan areas by GDP'

Or from the BEA:
https://apps.bea.gov/itable/iTable.cfm?ReqID=70&step=1

CAGDP2 Gross domestic product (GDP) by county and metropolitan area

Which gives $482 for DFW in 2017 and the $512 in 2018, which is a nice gain.

Search is: Begin Using the Data/GDP by County and MSA/GDP in Current Dollars/MSA/All Areas/All Industry/select the years you want...

The wikipedia values are different, so I'd recommend the values directly from the BEA.

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Cord1936
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Location: Design District

Re: DFW Economy

Postby Cord1936 » 14 Dec 2019 16:40

Image
Silicon Valley travel company tripling Dallas presence with 90K-SF Downtown Dallas Renaissance Tower lease
By Brian Womack and Ryan Salchert, Dallas Business Journal, Dec. 12, 2019

A Silicon Valley company in growth mode is taking down nearly 90,000 square feet in downtown Dallas.

TripActions, a Palo Alto, California-based company specializing in corporate travel, has leased 88,490 square feet at Renaissance Tower, Whitebox Real Estate, the company's local tenant representative, said Thursday. The company already has a presence nearby at 717 Harwood.

The lease, located on the top three floors of 1201 Elm Street, could be one of the largest office leases in downtown Dallas this year.

"We're thrilled to be expanding our team in Dallas to continue to scale our operations in support of our 5X year over year hyper growth globally," Leslie Crowe, chief people officer, said in an emailed messaged. "Dallas has been an amazing talent market for building our team of skilled and knowledgeable global travel agents who consistently deliver the best experience in business travel."

The company has just over 200 people in Dallas, up from 74 at the end of last year. The vast majority of the employees in the city are travel agents who support TripActions customers with corporate needs, such as booking, changes, and support while traveling. Other workers cover areas such as finance, workforce management, IT and operations.

It will be building out the new office space in the first quarter of 2020 and expect to move all the Dallas employees to the new space starting in April.
...
The center of Dallas is attracting more technology-focused companies amid demand for more workers in the field. Uber, another Silicon Valley company, has moved to a downtown site adjacent to Deep Ellum and is set to have 3,000 workers in the coming years.


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