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American Airlines

Posted: 04 Nov 2016 01:56
by Tnexster
Take a look at the roomier seats in American Airlines' newest Dreamliner

http://www.dallasnews.com/business/amer ... dreamliner

The latest version of American Airlines’ Boeing 787 Dreamliner was on display at a maintenance hangar near DFW International Airport Thursday, offering an up close look at the roomier premium economy cabin the company hopes will be a popular seller when it goes on sale next year.

The Boeing 787-9 is an extended version of the company’s 787-8 Dreamliner that debuted in American’s fleet last year. The new plane is 20 feet longer and seats 285 people, compared to the 226 seats on American’s 787-8.

The plane on display at American’s maintenance hangar Thursday hasn’t entered service yet, but a different 787-9 has been ferrying passengers between DFW Airport and Los Angeles International Airport for the last month.

Re: American Airlines

Posted: 05 Dec 2016 23:22
by Tnexster
American Airlines to reduce the number of Cuba flights

http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/news/ ... ights.html

Re: American Airlines

Posted: 05 May 2017 14:47
by Tnexster
Exclusive: American Airlines details plans for 1.8M SF campus in Fort Worth

http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/news/ ... -1-8m.html

Re: American Airlines

Posted: 15 Jun 2018 17:12
by jrd1964
American will name their upcoming headquarters building for former CEO Robert Crandall. The complex is still due for completion in the summer of next year.

https://www.dallasnews.com/business/ame ... ampus-name

Re: American Airlines

Posted: 13 Jul 2018 17:08
by jrd1964
American has recently announced plans to use biodegradable straws and wooden stir sticks, instead of plastic ones used up to now.

https://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/news ... straw.html

Re: American Airlines

Posted: 21 Sep 2018 23:17
by itsjrd1964
DMN and Bloomberg are reporting early talks between Emirates and Etihad Airways that could result in a merger. If so, their combined passenger traffic and market value would be larger than current airline leader American.

https://www.dallasnews.com/business/air ... ihad-merge

Re: American Airlines

Posted: 27 Nov 2018 12:14
by Tnexster
Why suburban office campuses aren’t really walkable

http://cityobservatory.org/why-suburban ... -walkable/

Here’s the bottom line: no matter how much your press release talks about miles of trails, or even a hundred bikes, if you build your new 12,000 person headquarters in a distant suburban greenfield, with hardly any transit or mixed land uses nearby, walled off from neighbors by freeways or major arterials, and plan for nearly one parking space for every employee, you’ve done almost nothing to create a walkable environment. Apparently American Airlines thinks that the new site plan will appeal to a younger generation of workers who wants more authentic walkability. Maybe, but only if their definition of walkability is walking to or from their car or between office buildings on the company website. People who want to walk, cycle or take transit from their homes to their workplaces will find it extremely difficult to realize that vision.

Re: American Airlines

Posted: 27 Nov 2018 13:49
by TNWE
Tnexster wrote:Why suburban office campuses aren’t really walkable

http://cityobservatory.org/why-suburban ... -walkable/

Here’s the bottom line: no matter how much your press release talks about miles of trails, or even a hundred bikes, if you build your new 12,000 person headquarters in a distant suburban greenfield, with hardly any transit or mixed land uses nearby, walled off from neighbors by freeways or major arterials, and plan for nearly one parking space for every employee, you’ve done almost nothing to create a walkable environment. Apparently American Airlines thinks that the new site plan will appeal to a younger generation of workers who wants more authentic walkability. Maybe, but only if their definition of walkability is walking to or from their car or between office buildings on the company website. People who want to walk, cycle or take transit from their homes to their workplaces will find it extremely difficult to realize that vision.


Like an American Airlines jet, the point just sailed waaaaay over this blogger's head. A throwaway quote about how people can walk or take a shared bike to another building for a meeting somehow turned into a few thousand words on how something that was never meant to be "walkable" isn't "walkable." I'm looking forward to his next post highlighting the huge disparity in property tax revenue between a 60-story condo tower and a two-lane asphalt road as conclusive proof that we shouldn't have any roads. :roll:

Re: American Airlines

Posted: 27 Nov 2018 16:37
by The_Overdog
It seems really stupid to have to take a bike or walk outside for a meeting on shared suburban campus. Are they saving buxx on a tiny office gym or concerned about their employee's vitamin D intake? Nortel's old campus in the Richardson Telecom corridor was haphazardly designed like that, but that was back in 1994.

Re: American Airlines

Posted: 28 Nov 2018 12:20
by muncien
I take no issue with the point the article is trying to make, but as is typical with many pieces like this, the snobbyness in which they do it is a turn off. You don't encourage behavior by presenting your point in such a self-obsessed/elitist tone. Instead, you discourage people who could actually learn from the topic from even pursuing it further.

Re: American Airlines

Posted: 28 Nov 2018 15:00
by TNWE
muncien wrote:I take no issue with the point the article is trying to make, but as is typical with many pieces like this, the snobbyness in which they do it is a turn off. You don't encourage behavior by presenting your point in such a self-obsessed/elitist tone. Instead, you discourage people who could actually learn from the topic from even pursuing it further.


Tone aside, it was completely ignorant of AA's goals with the new HQ - namely having a single campus that encompassed all of their headquarters functions, as opposed to their current split operation on both sides of 360. Given all the investment in a new IOC, plus the existing training and reservations facilities, it's a no-brainer to locate the corporate offices adjacent to those facilities. They spent extra money building a campus with parking garages at the perimeters and lots of green space in the middle, which beats the heck out of buildings surrounded by acres of concrete lots, and yet they still got criticized for not waving a magic wand and somehow turning Euless into Manhattan.

It would be one thing if this was a bank envelope-stuffing or loan servicing operation that could just as easily be located in a tower downtown, but there are tangible operational reasons for an airline headquarters to be near that airline's main hub. Plus, you can imagine the griping if AA plopped a plain beige box for their flight simulators and cabin training mock-ups on a prime piece of downtown real estate.

Re: American Airlines

Posted: 28 Nov 2018 16:32
by muncien
I do recall that AA HQ was strongly considering anchoring the Cowboy's Stadium site in Irving. While on the surface, such a proposal may not seem to different than what they have now, that Cowboy's Stadium site was going to include considerable mixed use development as well as an DART stop that provided service to DFW airport directly. It would have been considerably MORE walkable... With that perspective, I do think it's silly that they try to spin the new HQ to be the same. There are clearly differences... But as for making a walkable suburban stand alone campus... yes, they accomplished that. I just think that's a fairly 'low bar' for being considered 'walkable'.

Re: American Airlines

Posted: 28 Nov 2018 17:14
by flyswatter
Jet Blue is probably the best of all the US Airlines when it comes to "walkability" and HQ being well thought out in Long Island City. Of course, Amazon may force them to move to Orlando (long rumored due to cost of living). Yes, United is at Willis Tower but I have only heard how much of a pain it is from an operations standpoint being on so many floors. Walkable, but disjointed as an office.

Otherwise, SWA and Delta are just giant sprawling office buildings with bridges over parking lots and streets. I think it looks great, and the story is ridiculous. I'd love to hear about how green that place is going to be. I personally would love to work in a corporate hq like what they're building if I had to work in the burbs.

Re: American Airlines

Posted: 28 Nov 2018 19:08
by TNWE
flyswatter wrote:Jet Blue is probably the best of all the US Airlines when it comes to "walkability" and HQ being well thought out in Long Island City. Of course, Amazon may force them to move to Orlando (long rumored due to cost of living). Yes, United is at Willis Tower but I have only heard how much of a pain it is from an operations standpoint being on so many floors. Walkable, but disjointed as an office.

Otherwise, SWA and Delta are just giant sprawling office buildings with bridges over parking lots and streets. I think it looks great, and the story is ridiculous. I'd love to hear about how green that place is going to be. I personally would love to work in a corporate hq like what they're building if I had to work in the burbs.


United is rumored to want out (https://www.chicagobusiness.com/commerc ... 2-tailwind) and they still have significant operations near O'Hare for training and flight ops. On a global level, BA, AF and KLM are all located out near their respective hub airports, despite being nominally headquartered in walkable, transit-friendly World cities like London, Paris, and Amsterdam. Those companies obviously have no trouble attracting workers to their non-urban offices, even without the car-first culture that is so common in the US.

Long story short, not every company will have the same priorities when it comes to site selection, and people who fancy themselves an "urban economist and opinion leader" (like the author) should recognize that employees at an airline in Texas aren't neccesarily going to place the same premium on bike lanes and artisanal eateries as someone working at a think tank in Portland.