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Collin County Transportation

Tnexster
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Collin County Transportation

Postby Tnexster » 12 Dec 2016 15:19

Collin County’s plan to avoid traffic gridlock

http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/news/ ... dlock.html

Collin County cities of all sizes need to buy in to a county-led transportation improvement plan or face potentially insurmountable gridlock, Commissioner Duncan Webb warns.

Plano, Frisco, Allen, McKinney, Fairview, Farmersville, Princeton, Wylie and other cities all need to take a comprehensive view of current and future congestion problems to clear the road for continuing population and economic growth, the Collin County commissioner said.

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The_Overdog
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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby The_Overdog » 13 Dec 2016 09:18

His plan to 'end gridlock' involves building a highway out to Lake Lavon that connects with US75. Somehow I don't think the purpose of that is to 'end gridlock'.

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tamtagon
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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby tamtagon » 13 Dec 2016 10:59

These Collin County Transportation planners must fall under the direction of Urban Wilderness Planning.

Plane and simple, abusing the very thing about North Texas that makes rapid growth possible will be the very think that comes back and bites it in the end: presumed wide open spaces without natural boundaries.

The unalterable establishment of managed wilderness underwriting community farming is true mandate behind Dallas' Trinity River Park and should be the primary, mandated land use of all real estate between I-40 and US-175. The same land use umbrella should be applied in Collin County with the East Fork Trinity River.

No suburban neighborhood in North Texas should be more than 10 miles from a managed wilderness.

Collin County decision makers must chose now to protect quality of life; pervasive public transportation seamless to DART is the only answer to gridlock.

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electricron
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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby electricron » 13 Dec 2016 14:12

I don't have a problem with government setting aside public owned lands and waters for whatever purpose it decides; utility lines, transportation corridors, schools, wildlife refugees, wilderness areas, parks, and historic monumements; by city, county, federal, or state.

But I consider it an intrusion into private business and affairs when that property is owned privately. If the government wishes to set aside land for whatever reason, they better buy that land first and pay the property owners a fair price for their land.

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tamtagon
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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby tamtagon » 13 Dec 2016 19:19

electricron wrote:But I consider it an intrusion into private business and affairs when that property is owned privately. If the government wishes to set aside land for whatever reason, they better buy that land first and pay the property owners a fair price for their land.


I agree for the most part; land purchases to create a managed wilderness areas within and flanking urban/suburban areas should be handled the same way land was purchased to build the reservoirs. In my mind, the wilderness areas in North Texas would employ large series of wetland cells to supply drinking water.

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joshua.dodd
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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby joshua.dodd » 24 Dec 2016 02:08

As rapidly as Collin County is growing, the cities there certainly need to utilize public transportation. Both bus and rail. Building a new freeway from Lake Lavon to 75 is not a bad idea. But that alone will not be a solution. It will simply reallocate traffic from the city streets to a faster and more efficient route. I believe DART already owns the former Southern Pacific tracks that goes from Plano to McKinney. The county needs to allow DART to utilize this route and build out the light rail. I know there is still a lot of opposition to DART in the little towns along that route hindering DART from doing so. Nonetheless, it is more than essential, crucial really, that the county drafts a bus system for its dense areas and considers options for future rail corridors. Collin County is projected to surpass more than 1 million people within a few years. Maybe even 3.5 million within the next few decades. With the vast majority of corporate headquarter relocations being in this area, it is the epicenter of the Metroplex now.

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electricron
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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby electricron » 25 Dec 2016 02:01

DART owns then old SP rail corridor all the way past Sherman.
But what should be built is arguable. DART is not going to build a double track light rail line to Allen and McKinney unless they first join DART, and this train will be placed at the back of the line as far as future projects go. it'll take a 1% sales tax to join DART, which these cities would have to reconfigure because they are already charging that 1% for other things. It'll be far easier for them to reconfigure a 0.5% tax for transit. They could follow what DCTA did in Collin County, and use that DART owned corridor for commuter rail. A single track Commuter rail line could eventually go all the way to Sherman - assuming Grayson County joins Collin County on the train service. Sherman is much too far to run light rail trains to.

This idea will require a transfer platform at a station in Plano. It would have been nice if DART had left freight tracks in the corridor so future commuter rail lines could have upgraded and restored them. But DART didn't do so on the Red Line north. I believe they should have north of the Cotton Belt junction, like they did on the Green Line or on the Blue Line east of KCS junction. That would have allowed possible commuter trains running all the way into downtown Dallas and Fort Worth, where commuter train passengers transferring to the light rail lines will not full them to capacity upon departing the first station.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby dfwcre8tive » 22 Feb 2017 17:32

Collin County homeowners say plan to expand Highway 380 is 'just a punch in the gut'

Improving Highway 380 is a priority for Collin County.

Already, two and a half miles of the roadway at the Frisco/Prosper border are being upgraded to a six-lane freeway with access roads. The $60 million project extends from the Collin-Denton county border to just east of Preston Road. Multi-level overpasses will eventually be built at the intersections with the Dallas North Tollway and Preston Road.

Last year, McKinney council members passed a resolution opposing conversion of busy Highway 380 within their borders into a freeway because of a lack of right of way on each side.

"Everybody in the county, everybody in the region agrees that regional mobility in Collin County is a serious issue," said Michael Quint, executive director of development services for McKinney.

"But if you don't put in a limited access freeway somewhere, then 380 is going to be a glorified parking lot."


Image

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The_Overdog
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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby The_Overdog » 23 Feb 2017 12:33

I'm not a fan of highways in the downtown area but I understand they are sometimes needed, but 380 once you get outside downtown McKinney is out in BFE and it's got to really suck to buy country property and then have someone run a highway through it. People bought out there to get away from that kind of development, but now they have no choice. If the people who bought in Princeton, Farmersville, and points E/W had wanted to live in suburbia Collin County, they could have done so.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby Tivo_Kenevil » 23 Feb 2017 16:10

Prediction: new 380 does nothing to solve traffic!

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby Tnexster » 25 Feb 2017 10:12

Tivo_Kenevil wrote:Prediction: new 380 does nothing to solve traffic!


I talked to somebody that lives up off of 380 yesterday, said it can take 45 min to go 7 miles. They are moving away from that.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby tamtagon » 25 Feb 2017 11:00

Several cities in Collin County have demonstrated remarkable skill to organize & grow affluent communities and very desirable employment centers which deliver a high quality of living, so the expensive difficulty posed by detrimental commuter traffic congestion may seem like a curious oversight. But it's not curious and it's far more than an oversight.

The cities have orchestrated the remarkable, world wide acclaimed growth with little regard for the macro community. Orchestrating and maintaining a large city geared mostly toward an affluent residential population is not only derelict to economically disadvantaged populations, the tactics inflame and worsen economic strife among disadvantaged populations. Systemically similar, when a large and sprawling employment center is citified (gentrified) with high rises filling in the open spaces, the strain on quality of life is as remarkable as the growth.

The cities have not acted as neighbors to each other, and each one is building on the success of the others without proper study of shared problems and more critically without thorough acknowledgement of the new problems caused when high-flying success is shared but low down mundane duty is not.

Plano is in DART and that's it. Ridiculous that all the cities south of 380 are not already members.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby electricron » 26 Feb 2017 02:28

tamtagon wrote:Plano is in DART and that's it. Ridiculous that all the cities south of 380 are not already members.

Maybe the reason they aren't is DART's policies. Let's be frank, when DART was formed in the mid 1980s, none of the other cities in Collin County were large enough to attract any interests from DART. DART has never officially asked them to hold a referendum to join DART, so they haven't.
Collin County population/ Plano population:
Census 2010: 782,341 / 259,841
Census 2000: 491,675 / 222,030
Census 1990: 264,036 / 129,777
Census 1980: 144,576 / 72,000
Census 1970: 66,920 / 17,872
Plano held its referendum to join DART in 1983, and another in 1989 to remain in DART. Lots of cities held a second referendum in 1989.
Those voting to remain in DART were Carrolton, Irving, Rowlett, Plano, Farmers Branch, and Garland, while Flower Mound voted to withdraw from DART.
FYI: Note Plano was about half of Collin County's population between 1980 to 1990.

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tamtagon
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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby tamtagon » 26 Feb 2017 09:26

electricron wrote:
tamtagon wrote:Plano is in DART and that's it. Ridiculous that all the cities south of 380 are not already members.

Maybe the reason they aren't is DART's policies. Let's be frank, when DART was formed in the mid 1980s, none of the other cities in Collin County were large enough to attract any interests from DART.


word

DART and state policies need updating. DCTA, The T and DART should operate as a single entity.

I have little doubt, though, the transportation challenges in Southern Collin County will be addressed very efficiently; planners there may even come up with a funding and membership model that helps the whole region. Sometimes I think DART decision makers should all be replaced, that they're self-constrained to an outmoded way of thinking about public transportation.

I don't know how much can be done to alleviate congestion on the major streets and thoroughfares in Plano Legacy-Frisco Billion $$ Mile.... Many smart thinkers believe new technology will make carpooling much more popular in the years to come, so that'll help, but probably will not reach the passenger-per-vehicle count to take the sting out of a 45 minute ride seven miles down the road, buses and trains will have to help carry workers to offices.

Hopefully, train service will be figured out that connects the region's new CBD-Plano/Frisco to Love Field, Texas Central, and DFW Airport.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby tanzoak » 26 Feb 2017 09:48

tamtagon wrote:I have little doubt, though, the transportation challenges in Southern Collin County will be addressed very efficiently.


I thought this was sarcasm at first. Such faith!

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby tamtagon » 26 Feb 2017 11:23

tanzoak wrote:
tamtagon wrote:I have little doubt, though, the transportation challenges in Southern Collin County will be addressed very efficiently.


I thought this was sarcasm at first. Such faith!


haha I know, right?

Whatever sucky traffic there's there now will suck more for sure, but Plano and Frisco road planners are already working together to figure out how to minimize the growing suckiness :lol: and I am confident they'll come up with a great plan.

I'm really not too sure what'll happen with mass transit. Getting a train to the emerging Plano/Frisco CBD is under study too (I think) and that's the big wild card, who knows what will happen. Connecting to the big airport will be a priority, but so will connecting to Love Field and the talent-magnet quality of life only available in downtown Dallas neighborhoods.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby Tnexster » 28 Feb 2017 16:05

tamtagon wrote:The cities have not acted as neighbors to each other, and each one is building on the success of the others without proper study of shared problems and more critically without thorough acknowledgement of the new problems caused when high-flying success is shared but low down mundane duty is not.

Plano is in DART and that's it. Ridiculous that all the cities south of 380 are not already members.


I don't think that will change, Frisco has no interest in DART. They are looking at options and are completely aware of the issue but don't want to be part of DART. I believe they view it as an antiquated model that no longer meets the needs and are looking to more forward-thinking alternatives such as local street cars, Uber, and other options. Ideas that do more to make direct connections between the person in need and business. At least that is my impression from talking with them.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby tanzoak » 28 Feb 2017 16:28

Tnexster wrote:I believe they view it as an antiquated model that no longer meets the needs and are looking to more forward-thinking alternatives such as local street cars, Uber, and other options. Ideas that do more to make direct connections between the person in need and business. At least that is my impression from talking with them.


A streetcar would be particularly worthless in Frisco, and it certainly wouldn't address any actual transportation issues.

Uber is great, but it does nothing to address congestion unless there's a high level of pooling, which is tough due to how spread out everything is.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby muncien » 28 Feb 2017 16:29

Tnexster wrote:
tamtagon wrote:The cities have not acted as neighbors to each other, and each one is building on the success of the others without proper study of shared problems and more critically without thorough acknowledgement of the new problems caused when high-flying success is shared but low down mundane duty is not.

Plano is in DART and that's it. Ridiculous that all the cities south of 380 are not already members.


I don't think that will change, Frisco has no interest in DART. They are looking at options and are completely aware of the issue but don't want to be part of DART. I believe they view it as an antiquated model that no longer meets the needs and are looking to more forward-thinking alternatives such as local street cars, Uber, and other options. Ideas that do more to make direct connections between the person in need and business. At least that is my impression from talking with them.


If that indeed is the case, it is good news. In today's world of super convenience, transit alternatives that offer A to Z function are necessary. Nobody is going to be willing to sit from through B, C, D, E, F.... etc. while trying to get to their destination. These sprawling burbs happen to have many more in between stops than dense cities and they exacerbate the problem.

I've actually been anxious to see how the future of public transportation unfolds. But I tend to agree that current models are antiquated and wont work. I'm just not sure if we have what it takes for it's replacement just yet.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby Tnexster » 28 Feb 2017 16:51

The future of public transportation will likely be here much sooner than anybody expects. The bigger problem will be getting the old world transportation dinosaurs to accept it and make the necessary adjustments. This is where Frisco and other suburbs have the advantage. They have a clean slate.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby tanzoak » 28 Feb 2017 17:50

Tnexster wrote:The future of public transportation will likely be here much sooner than anybody expects. The bigger problem will be getting the old world transportation dinosaurs to accept it and make the necessary adjustments. This is where Frisco and other suburbs have the advantage. They have a clean slate.


The future of public transportation is not going to be able to change the underlying physics.

Just so we're clear about what we're debating, what future are you (and others) referring to, and what problem(s) do you think public transportation in the Collin County context should be designed to solve?

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby Tivo_Kenevil » 28 Feb 2017 21:32

Tnexster wrote:The future of public transportation will likely be here much sooner than anybody expects. The bigger problem will be getting the old world transportation dinosaurs to accept it and make the necessary adjustments. This is where Frisco and other suburbs have the advantage. They have a clean slate.


Idk what u mean. But if you think private Autonomous vehicles/ ride hailing start ups will nullify the need for transit over night. I think you're going to be disappointed.

NYC is seeing right now how Uber is making traffic worse in the city.

And AVs won't be the first choice of many right off the bat. We're still decades away from that. Not to mention everything we build is of Tollways..And getting further away from city center.

The only way to reduce congestion is getting less cars on the road.

Mass transit still will be needed in the future.

As for the clean slate advantage.. I don't see Frisco Or McKinney striving for Transit. They already said they don't want to fund it.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby joshua.dodd » 01 Mar 2017 02:07

If there is anything Sim City and Cities Skylines has taught me, it's that with a growing city and metro, no matter what you do, there will always ALWAYS be traffic congestion issues.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby tamtagon » 01 Mar 2017 08:57

Tnexster wrote:The future of public transportation will likely be here much sooner than anybody expects. The bigger problem will be getting the old world transportation dinosaurs to accept it and make the necessary adjustments. This is where Frisco and other suburbs have the advantage. They have a clean slate.


I'm very interested to see what they come up with. Hopefully DART and transportation planners for the newest Metroplex CBD will integrate.

The eventual transportation solutions for Frisco probably will not apply to present day Frisco, that town has a long way to grow... Plano has a long way to grow... Zoning density, land use, population and mobility all go together.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby muncien » 01 Mar 2017 09:57

Tivo_Kenevil wrote:
Tnexster wrote:The future of public transportation will likely be here much sooner than anybody expects. The bigger problem will be getting the old world transportation dinosaurs to accept it and make the necessary adjustments. This is where Frisco and other suburbs have the advantage. They have a clean slate.


Idk what u mean. But if you think private Autonomous vehicles/ ride hailing start ups will nullify the need for transit over night. I think you're going to be disappointed.

NYC is seeing right now how Uber is making traffic worse in the city.

And AVs won't be the first choice of many right off the bat. We're still decades away from that. Not to mention everything we build is of Tollways..And getting further away from city center.

The only way to reduce congestion is getting less cars on the road.

Mass transit still will be needed in the future.

As for the clean slate advantage.. I don't see Frisco Or McKinney striving for Transit. They already said they don't want to fund it.


This is why I think the 'Mass' part of Mass Transit (trains & subways) will continue to have a decent shelf life. The biggest change will be in the last (three) miles of the trip. I easily see ride hailing/autonomous vehicles shrinking in size. Single or possibly double occupancy vehicles with smaller footprints that can fit side by side in a traditional lane will seemingly be the best bet. In an autonomous nature, they can share lanes and squeeze out of sight when not needed. Transportation agencies can subsidize trips on these, feeding riders into their train system, instead of maintaining fleets of buses, which I'm almost certain will be obsolete in sunbelt type cities.
IMO, that has always been the biggest challenge to transit. The first and last leg not getting you to exactly where you need to be, and the scheduling conflicts between each leg. On demand services on each end will eliminate that concern.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby tanzoak » 01 Mar 2017 10:40

Yeah, that model is a compelling one for suburb-to-city commuting. Cheap and ubiquitous AV taxis collect people in the residential neighborhoods, drop them at the rail station to go downtown.

But what about the suburb-to-suburb problem we're talking about here? Without those big collectors, the dominant model is still everyone driving there. Whether by personal vehicle or AV taxi, it doesn't make a difference. If anything, large-scale transition to AV taxi would exacerbate the problem, as reduced parking needs would facilitate even denser development. The only thing that changes the calculus in this scenario is a high level of pooling in the AV taxis.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby muncien » 01 Mar 2017 11:15

tanzoak wrote:Yeah, that model is a compelling one for suburb-to-city commuting. Cheap and ubiquitous AV taxis collect people in the residential neighborhoods, drop them at the rail station to go downtown.

But what about the suburb-to-suburb problem we're talking about here? Without those big collectors, the dominant model is still everyone driving there. Whether by personal vehicle or AV taxi, it doesn't make a difference. If anything, large-scale transition to AV taxi would exacerbate the problem, as reduced parking needs would facilitate even denser development. The only thing that changes the calculus in this scenario is a high level of pooling in the AV taxis.


Correct... Which is why commuter rail lines (much like the Cotton Belt which gets so much flack here) are critical to the future of transportation. You can't make autonomous vehicles small and fast enough to manage all A to Z trips.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby tamtagon » 01 Mar 2017 12:03

The transportation answers cannot occur until we know how dense CBD Plano/Frisco is intended. What an interesting prospect, the sprawling corporate campus capital turning into a slice of Manhattan. How can that be. Is that even part of the equation?

Certainly building a highly concentrated employment destination with rail access for the highly concentrated downtown Dallas population would make sense (reverse commute no longer measurable). Locale mobility is dynamic, regional node to node is fixed on a rail.

Downtown Dallas shows no signs of slowing population growth, it'll last for more than 20 years and the same seems true for employment growth in Plano-Frisco. Frankly, I think North Dallas Tollway will become a hybrid highway, cars and trains.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby Tnexster » 01 Mar 2017 12:12

Driverless, meh. Uber sets sights on flying cars across Dallas

http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/news/ ... -cars.html

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tamtagon
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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby tamtagon » 01 Mar 2017 12:35

Radical

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby Tnexster » 02 Mar 2017 09:58

McKinney Urban Transit District Holds First Public Meeting

https://communityimpact.com/dallas-fort ... dcta-taps/

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby Tnexster » 02 Mar 2017 09:59

Tnexster wrote:McKinney Urban Transit District Holds First Public Meeting

https://communityimpact.com/dallas-fort ... dcta-taps/


The McKinney Urban Transit District held its first meeting Tuesday to discuss potential options for public transit within the McKinney Urbanized Area, which consists of McKinney, Celina, Princeton, Melissa and Lowry Crossing.

The MUTD board includes all members of McKinney City Council and representatives from the other four cities.

“This is not a discussion regarding whether we have public transit or not; it’s more of a discussion looking at who we contract with and what those levels of transit look like,” McKinney Mayor Brian Loughmiller said.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby Tnexster » 13 Mar 2017 16:04

Study projects huge economic boost with congestion solution for U.S. Highway 380

http://www.dallasnews.com/news/collin-c ... ighway-380

A new study shows that making U. S. Highway 380 in Collin County a limited access highway would not only ease congestion along the busy roadway, but also provide a huge boost to the economy.

The study by The Perryman Group concludes that the economic benefits of a highway with fewer intersections and access points far outweigh the loss from businesses that would have to move due to the expansion.

"Without the conversion, congestion would be an increasing problem, eroding quality of life for current residents and decreasing the ability of the economy to continue to prosper," according to the study.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby Tnexster » 15 Mar 2017 10:23

Duplicate story, different title......

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby Tnexster » 09 May 2017 17:41

Plano readies roads for first wave of Toyota employees, and the traffic that comes with them

https://www.dallasnews.com/business/toy ... ffic-comes
The opening of Toyota’s North American headquarters here next week brings the first major wave of employees who will be testing the city’s plans to accommodate thousands — and eventually tens of thousands of people — all driving, walking and using buses to get to work.

Plano officials say there’s no reason to panic. They’ve been tinkering and tweaking to prepare. The reality, though, is there will be growing pains.

“We’ve done a lot of advanced planning over the years for that particular area, so we have the network, we have the roads, we have the strategies, we have the future timing plans,” said Lloyd Neal, the city’s transportation engineering manager. “There are a lot of unknowns still, but we are planning for it.”

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby Tnexster » 29 Jun 2017 15:15

Staggered work shifts, $1B in tollway expansion planned to address congestion in Plano

http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/news/ ... j=78471121

Employers will collaborate to stagger work hours and explore other options such as telecommuting, flexible hours, midday shuttle service in the Legacy area and incentives for carpooling, ridesharing or using public transit options.

Plano is re-timing 228 traffic signals, and that effort is already paying off, Braster said.

The North Texas Tollway Authority, meanwhile, is in the midst of massive expansions and improvements to meet the future traffic needs, said Elizabeth Mow, assistant executive director of NTTA.


By February 2018, Dallas Area Rapid Transit will launch its Mobility on Deman technology to test a tool to track traffic circulation and last-mile connectivity within Legacy. A collaboration between the TMA and DART would also open up more opportunities for carpool transportation.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby Tivo_Kenevil » 29 Jun 2017 16:49

So you Battle congestion by inviting people to drive...but this time on a tollway.

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Re: Collin County Transportation

Postby muncien » 30 Jun 2017 10:25

It's probably just a matter of time before those little autonomous shuttles make their way here...
If that N/S commuter rail corridor ever gets built, and a station placed where it intersects Grandscape blvd, those little autonomous shuttles would be the perfect compliment to establish last mile connectivity throughout this area.


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